Canadian Association of Social Workers supports BI

In October the Canadian Association of Social Workers (CASW) released a position paper recommending a Universal Basic Income (uBIG) to ensure no person in Canada lives in poverty; bolster the Canadian economy; and put an end to income assistance systems that are often inefficient and unkind.

“The cost of current income support programs in Canada is close to $200 billion per year, but are piece-meal, often stigmatizing, vary from province to province, and are ultimately unsuccessful at breaking the cycle of poverty,” said CASW President, Jan Christianson-Wood. “It’s very easy to blame the individual, but when you take a closer look, many income assistance systems actually trap people in poverty. It’s time to change that, and move from the idea of a ‘safety-net,’ to an equitable floor on which we can all stand,” stated Christianson-Wood. “What makes uBIG special is that it doesn’t use a clawback – people should be empowered to work, while knowing they have a stable support system behind them.”

“uBIG isn’t a panacea – but it is the next piece of the puzzle. We have the means in Canada to lift everyone out of poverty, and we need to act on the knowledge that poverty isn’t a personal problem, it’s a systemic one,” concluded Christianson-Wood.  Click here to read the report.

In-depth Reading and Audio-Visual Resources

Basic Income: An Idea Whose Time Has Come. A TED talk delivered by Dr. James Mulvale at the TEDxUManitoba event, 24 March 2016

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Highlights of the North American Basic Income Guarantee Congress in May 2016 (produced by Winnipeg Harvest)

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Presentations at the NABIG Congress 2016

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Sid Frankel and James Mulvale, Support and Inclusion for All Manitobans: Steps Toward A Basic Income Scheme (2014) 37 Manitoba Law Review, pp 425-464

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Basic Income: An Anti-Poverty Strategy for Social Work. Audio podcast by Dr. James Mulvale, University of Manitoba, with Dr. Gretchen Ely. Episode 165 of in SocialWork podcast series of the School of Social Work, University at Buffalo (New York).

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